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North Carolina County of the Week: Stanly County, NC

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The NC County of the Week for March 29 – April , 2015 is Stanly County!

Stanly County, North Carolina was created in 1841 from Montgomery County and is located in the Piedmont region of the state. Its namesake is John Stanly, Speaker of the North Carolina House of Commons and a former U.S> congressman.

Join us this week to explore all things Stanly County: history, people, culture, geography, genealogy, and natural heritage!

For more information on this  NC county, follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Join the conversation by using hash tag #nccotw. Be sure to also check out our Pinterest board for Stanly County where we’ll showcase a range of historic images and documents available online!

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ncghl
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/ncghl/stanly-county-north-carolina/
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/ncpedia

Free Genealogy Workshop: Using the North Carolina Digital Collections for Genealogical Research

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FREE WORKSHOP

Using the North Carolina Digital Collections for

Genealogical Research

May 2, 2015, 10-11a.m.

digitalcollections1   (more…)

State Doc Pick of the Week : Opportunities And Challenges for Southeast Raleigh

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This document is a bit older, 2004, but it gives a good opportunity for comparison and a chance to see if Southeast Raleigh has improved at all since 2004.

This document is titled, “A University-Community Partnership Feasibility Study : Opportunities and Challenges for Southeast Raleigh : Executive Summary & Final Report”. It’s by North Carolina State University Associate Professor & MSW Program Director, Dr. Jocelyn DeVance Taliaferro.

This is a scholarly study that contains the usual executive summary, methodology, results, discussions and recommendations that you would expect to see in any scholarly study. It is perfect for anyone interested in social work or anyone that is interested to see if Southeast Raleigh has progressed since 2004.

You can view, download, print, and save this document  here.Print

Quilting in the Old North State: A New North Carolina History in NCpedia

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Quilting in the Old North State: A New North Carolina History in NCpedia

By Kelly Agan, North Carolina Government & Heritage Library

This week, as we near the end of Women’s History Month and National Quilt Month, NCpedia published a seven-part history of quilting in North Carolina, with many, many thanks to Diana Bell-Kite, a curator at the North Carolina Museum of History, who took time to research, write, and share this history with us.  This contribution filled an important space in NCpedia’s coverage of the state’s history and it coincided, serendipitously, with the tapestry theme of Women’s History Month: Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives. Whether you’re interested in quilting or you want to learn more about material culture and social history from the 18th to the 21st century, please visit this content.  And we’ve added numerous images of quilts from the Museum’s collections.

Funeral Ribbon Quilt, Lee Co., NC, 1958

Funeral Ribbon Quilt, Lee Co., NC, 1958, from the NC Museum of History

First a little about National Quilt Day and Month. National Quilt Day appears to have grown out of an event called “Quilters’ Day Out”, originated by the Kentucky Heritage Quilt Society and celebrated on the 3rd Saturday of March in 1989.  The National Quilting Association held its annual quilt show and conference in Lincoln, Nebraska a few years later in 1991 and decided to build on the enthusiasm and interest created by the Kentucky event, establishing National Quilt Day that year.  Somewhere along the line, National Quilt Month formed as a month-long celebration.  (If you know more about the origin of these events, please let us know!) (more…)

This blog is a service of the State Library of North Carolina, part of the NC Department of Cultural Resources. Blog comments and posts may be subject to Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.